Food tour in Bratislava

Food tour in Bratislava

When visiting different countries, I always check if there is a food tour available. This is a great way to taste many dishes, and get to know the food culture.

Visiting Bratislava was no exception. I signed up for the Traditional Food Tour offered by Taste Bratislava, and set off on what would be a heavy lunch including a little bit of tipsiness…

Meeting by the Opera house, we had a short walk to our first stop; Café Škodovka. The cute cafe is named after the car, and the interior include half of an old Skoda. The furniture’s are vintage style from the 70s, and the guide could remember having the exact same in their living room when growing up, as there very limited choices during the Soviet era.

Retro style at Café Škodovka. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.
The food also had its offspring from that period, and soon three different dishes stood before us, accompanied with white bread.

Parižsky šalát, reska v majonéze and Oškvarková pomazánka. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.
Treska v majonéze is a cod fish salad with mayo, made to make fish more attractive so more people would eat it as it was important as nutrition.
Parižsky šalát, or Paris salad, is sausage mixed with mayo, peas and gherkin.
Oškvarková pomazánka is a spread made of crushed crispy bacon with mustard, onion, herbs and spices.

The first one was my favorite, and the latter took a bit of time to get used to.
For drinks we were introduced to the Slovak red wine Dunaj.

The Slovak red wine Dunaj. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.
During the Communist times, farms owned by private persons were also part of the nationalization program introduced by the Communist party. Collectivization of farms meant small, independent farmers were forced to become part of agricultural mass production based on cooperative principles. The cooperative agricultural system was perceived as an aggressive measure which interfered with the traditional way of life of people in rural Slovakia. Quantity was more important than quality, including when it came to wine. After the fall of the Communist Regime, the people had to prove their rights to get back the land that was previously theirs.

Nowadays, many small winemakers make high quality wine, winning international prices. The production is still low though, and as the local consumption is higher than the production, nothing is exported. Yet another reason to visit Slovakia, to get to try the local wines that are not found outside the country. For me, it was unfortunately limited to this one glass, but they also offer more specific wine tasting tours as well, or paired with food.
Some local varieties are the result of crossbreeding popular grape varieties. A nice curiosity is that all new white crossbreeds are named after Slovak castles, while the few new red wines are named after Slovak rivers.

Moving on, we had a quick stop outside the old market hall. In addition to the Saturday market, events and concerts are also held here. This interesting building from 1910 was inspired by the Eiffel tower, and was used as a TV studio during the Communist times.

Our next dishes were served at Flagship Bratislavská reštauracia. I actually had my dinner here the day before, but had absolutely no problem with returning, as it was a great experience. I had already tried the Bryndzové halušky, sheep-cheese dumplings, that is also the national dish, but the Kapustnica (sauerkraut soup) was new to me.

Bryndzové halušky, sheep-cheese dumplings with bacon, that is also the Slovak national dish. Flagship Bratislavská reštauracia. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Bryndzové halušky, sheep-cheese dumplings with bacon, that is also the Slovak national dish. Flagship Bratislavská reštauracia.

Kapustnica (sauerkraut soup) at Flagship Bratislavská reštauracia. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Kapustnica (sauerkraut soup) at Flagship Bratislavská reštauracia.

The soup is a very popular dish, especially in winter and for Christmas and New Years. It is often eaten as a starter on Christmas Eve, before the carp is served as the common main dish. This is where it becomes interesting… Apparently, it is Christmas tradition to buy a live carp, bring it home, and let it swim around in the bathtub for a few days! The kids even name it and play with it! I must admit I found it hard to believe, but I had no reason not to trust what the guide told us. It is however a reason for the tradition; carp is a freshwater fish and a bottom feeder, so it is believed that by swimming around in clean water, the mud will be cleansed out, and it will taste better. I have only tasted carp once in my life, and that had certainly not ended its days swimming in a bathtub… But as I strive to eat whatever food is common where I am travelling, I would be willing to give it another try. Especially if it had gone through the second traditional treatment, being soaked in milk overnight to make it taste even softer.

Enough about the food. For drinks we enjoyed a local lager craft beer, brewed in the micro brewery at the ground floor. While lager still is the most popular beer, more and more micro breweries has popped up, introducing the Slovakian people to other types of beer. And the locals sure love their brew; the average consumption is 75 liter beer per person yearly!
Do you think that sounds a lot? Their neighbours in Czech Republic has the worlds highest yearly consumption of beer, and drink 120 liter per person…

The bar at Meštiansky pivovar, a popular micro brewery. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

The bar at Meštiansky pivovar, a popular micro brewery.

We only had half a liter beer, though, before moving on. This time we were served the non-alcoholic Kofola, the local version of cola. During the communist era, they could not import Coca Cola, so all the former Soviet bloc has made their own variety. The Kofola is made by 20 different herbs and spices, and can be found on tap basically in every bar.

Kofola, the local version of cola. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Kofola, the local version of cola.

Roast duck is a very popular dish, especially in fall when it is the main season. It is traditionally served with red cabbage and potato pancake. In general you will find a lot of potatoes in the Slovak diet, but it was not introduced to the country until the 1700s, and made popular by the Austro-Hungarian Queen Maria Theresia.

Pečená kačica s lokšami a dusenou červenou kapustou - roast duck served with potato pancakes and steamed red cabbage. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Pečená kačica s lokšami a dusenou červenou kapustou – roast duck served with potato pancakes and steamed red cabbage.

Sviečková na smotane - beef with steamed bread-dumpling and carrot-parsnip sauce. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Sviečková na smotane – beef with steamed bread-dumpling and carrot-parsnip sauce.

I was getting quite stuffed, so after just tasting a bit of the Sviečková na smotane, beef with steamed bread-dumpling and carrot-parsnip sauce, we got going to walk off a little of the food.
Heading to the old town, we went through the north gate of the once fortified city.

By the Michael's gate, the north entrance to the once fortified old town of Bratislava. Slovakia.

By the Michael’s gate, the north entrance to the once fortified old town of Bratislava.

After learning a bit of history along the way, we entered Obchod v múzeu, a combination of a small shop formed as an old general store with a museum in the back with old shop artifacts. Among them was also a bottle of sparkling wine from back in the days when wine was still exported. This particular wine, Palugyay, was actually to be found on the wine list on board Titanic.

We were soon taken back to present time, and the Bratislava rolls (Bratislavské rožky) filled with either poppy seeds or walnut paste was up next. Surprisingly, I found space for them as well, with the walnut flavored being my favorite.

Bratislavské rožky - Bratislava rolls - traditional pastry filled with poppy seeds or wallnuts. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Bratislavské rožky – Bratislava rolls – traditional pastry filled with poppy seeds or wallnuts.

With sweets, came also the bitter-sweet black currant wine – Ríbezlové víno. And salty and smoked sheep cheese. By then I had for real reached my limit for solid food, and only had a taste of it. Personally I figured it would match better with beer anyway, so good thing I was planning to continue to a beer festival after the tour, since they would not allow me to leave without the rest of the cheese. The hand made chocolate with sour cherry liqueur also found its way to my purse and was saved for later.

Ovčie nite - sheep cheese. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Ovčie nite – sheep cheese.

Handmade Sour cherry in sour cherry liqueur covered with chocolate. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Handmade sour cherry soaked in in sour cherry liqueur for at least half a year and then dipped in chocolate.

Just a stone’s throw away, we entered a honey shop to taste the products made from their own beehives. I found myself amazed that it was at least 20 different flavours available, and tried a few of them. The combination of honey and ginger would do magic for sore throats!

Different types of flavoured honey. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

They of course also produce honey wine, also known as mead. Good thing a small amount of fluid easily can fit in a stuffed stomach.

Medovina - honey wine (mead). Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Medovina – honey wine (mead).

In a back alley in the old town, we found “The white mouse”, a shop selling wine and liquor, including the local tea-herbal liquor. There are several varieties of the Tatratea, ranging from 72 % down to much lower % with more fruity flavor. We tried the original with 52 % alcohol and I must say, I much prefer that one to the more known equivalent Jägermeister and Fernet Branca.

Tatranský čaj - TatraTea - local tea-herbal liquer 52 %. Food tour in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Tatranský čaj – TatraTea – local tea-herbal liquer 52 %.

Stuffed, happy, and a little bit tipsy, I thanked the guide for her knowledge about the food and the city, and ventured off to explore more on my own.

PS: I only had a light snack for dinner in the evening. And the smoked sheep cheese sticks with the festival beer….

Practical information:
The Traditional Food Tour can be booked through Taste Bratislava. Booking in advance is essential.
Price: 59 € per person
Duration: 3-4 hours
Meeting place: Depends on the group, but in a central location downtown. Please ask when you book.

Food tour in Paris with a local

Food tour in Paris with a local

France is for many synonymous with food, so what could be more natural than to experience this part of the culture with a local who knows the food scene as her own pocket?

The website WithLocals has gathered residents in several cities all over the world, offering various excursions, meals in private homes, and as I was now about to try; food tours. I previously had good experience from this service, so I was very eager to repeat the success. To be completely honest, this was the first thing I checked after the plane tickets were booked.

I instantly fell for the trip “Paris Favourite Food tour: the 10 Tastings” and thought that it had to be the perfect way to be acquainted with the Parisian food culture.

A few weeks later the time was suddenly there. One of my weaknesses is to underestimate how long it takes to go from one place to another in big cities, but Maria waited patiently outside a bakery right next to Marche d’Aligre. This was also where she bought the classic long French baguette that would accompany us through the streets. The first time was in symphony with lovely tapenade from one of the stalls of the Marche d’Aligre. The variations were many, so we were having a really hard time determining which one to choose before we decided to rely on Maria’s taste buds and went for her favorite; Tapenade with basil. We did not regret, and consumed pieces of baguette dipped in tapenade while Maria knowledgeable told us about this historical place. Marche d’Aligre is dating back to the 1700 ‘s, but since it is a wooden construction, parts of it has burned many times. The market hall is a historic building, and therefore has to be rebuilt the same way as the original.

Wide selection of tapenade at Marche d'Aligre. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Wide selection of tapenade at Marche d’Aligre.

Marche d’Aligre is the local market in District 12. All districts have their own market, but this is the only one in Paris being open throughout the week. Here you will find all kinds of fresh produce from the countryside, depending on the season.

We went for a walk around and looked at all the delights while working up the appetite. Fortunately, next stop was not far away.

Right across the street from the market, we sat down at Charolais, a popular bar among the people working at the market. It is the only place in Paris open for breakfast as early as 06.00. We were way passed that hour now though, and oysters were next on the menu. According to Maria, are these the best oysters in Paris, and are delivered from the market. I have to admit that oysters are not a part of my everyday food, but we enjoyed a few pieces each with a little bit of lemon squeezed on top. Super fresh and delicious!

Delicious fresh oysters at Charolais. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Delicious fresh oysters at Charolais.

From salty and bitter, we were now heading for sweet. As we walked through the streets, Maria told us about the area. For the small community it is important to maintain the offers available, so if a bakery had to close down, people who want to start up a new bakery has priority. Thanks to this, it had been a bakery at the premises of our next stop for 150 years.

Paris-Brest is a cake that is inspired by the bicycle race that runs between the two cities. Originally, it was formed like a bicycle wheel with a hole in the middle, but is now available in various shapes. With cream of hazelnut and chestnut, and pastry with almonds, this is not something for nut allergic. For us on the other hand, it was lovely.

Paris-Brest cake. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Paris-Brest cake.

French wine was next runner up, pared with cheeses and cured meats. The location was a combined wine shop, bar and gallery, a quiet and comfortable place. They only offer organic wine, so Maria could assure that our teeth would still be white, and we would not get a headache. If consumption was moderate, that is….

Ici Meme, a great place for wine! Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Ici Meme, a great place for organic wine!

Wine, charcutterie and cheese planche. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Wine, charcutterie and cheese planche.

The wine was so good that we stayed for a bit longer than planned. Moving on, we continued through narrow passages and around historic sites, and the trendy design- and party area in the 11th District, before we reached a delicate cheese store. It was too much to choose from, so again we relied on Maria’s recommendation; a sharp blue cheese. The baguette that had accompanied us throughout the evening again came to use.

So much nice cheese to choose from! Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

So much nice cheese to choose from!

From flavorful cheese it was time for sweet dessert again. The selection of macrons at Maison Georges Larnicol were many, but we were able to coordinate by taking two different flavors each and taste from each other. Heavenly!

The large collection of macrons at Georges Larnicol. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

The large collection of macrons at Georges Larnicol.

The winners at Georges Larnicol. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

The winners at Georges Larnicol.

Georges Larnicol is originally from the region of Brittany, and followed in his father’s footsteps and became the pastry chef and opened his first pastry shop in the 80’s. He quickly made success and opened more stores in the region. In 2010, he started his first one in Paris, but despite his success, he is one of the few pastry chefs and chocolatiers that keep the prices affordable. He believes that quality should be available to all. A nice philosophy.

The original tour would have continued on to sample some Galette au fromage (a savory crepe made of buckwheat) but we completely fell for the charm of the restaurants in the archways around the Place des Vosges when we passed by earlier, so we decided to go back there instead. The square was built between 1605 and 1612, and is the oldest in Paris. Originally it was named Place Royale, and was an important meeting place for the nobility. After the revolution, the square was renamed to take the name of the first region in France that did not pay the royal tax.

We found a spot by the heating lamps outside Ma Bourgogne. The warm toned lighting under the archways created a unique ambiance while we enjoyed even more French specialties; snails and beef tartar. And a little more French wine, of course.

Warm atmosphere outside Ma Bourgogne. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Warm atmosphere sitting outside Ma Bourgogne.

Traditional snails at Ma Bourgogne. Food tour Paris, France. Withlocals

Traditional snails at Ma Bourgogne.

Maria was the perfect guide, combining the experience of eating our way through Paris with educational facts. Even if Maria is the one designing the tour, she has taught the route to several others who can give you good experiences in this wonderful food universe if she is not available.

Were you tempted by this wonderful dining experience in Paris? The trip “Paris Favourite Food tour: the 10 Tastings” can also be customized, as we ended up doing. Since we chose a more expensive option, we paid the extra at the last restaurant. You can also plan your own version with the guide in advance.

In addition to the food tour, you can also see other experiences in Paris offered by With Locals.

Staying overnight at YOTELAIR at Schiphol

Premium cabin at YOTELAIR at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol.

Premium cabin at YOTELAIR at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol.

You have probably all experienced it, long connections at the airport between flights. Long layovers can be a pain in the ass, but it does not have to be like that. 

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is a major connecting hub, and for many visitors that means long layovers, often in connection with long and exhausting flights. Make most of the time and get some nice rest by check in at YOTELAIR for a few hours, or even for the night.  

Entering what I named the pink light district, the dimmed light and the absence of sounds gave me an instant feeling I would have a good night sleep. Unlike the red-light district downtown, you come here for rest, not different kinds of entertainment. The room can be rented by the hour, or you can spend the whole night. Just remember to shut the window blinds so you do not become the entertainment…

The room is well exploited, and has everything you need. The bed is made up as a couch when you enter, with a folding table just in front of it. Above that, there is a TV, and several electric sockets including USB, to fit all zones. Genius in case you sent your adapter in the checked luggage…

If you did not send any luggage and have a fair share of carry-on, there is a lot of space for your belongings under the bed. 

The bathroom is surprisingly spacious, with a huge monsoon rain shower, and body wash and shampoo included. The restroom is separated with a glass wall, but there is a curtain to cover it up. If you prefer more privacy, you can send your travel partner to the reception to sit and enjoy the free coffee, tea or hot chocolate that is served 24 hours.

The bathroom in a Premium cabin at YOTELAIR at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. There is also a monsoon rain shower.

The bathroom in a Premium cabin at YOTELAIR at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. There is also a monsoon rain shower.

We arrived around 21.30, and I was honestly surprised that all the shops and restaurants were closed already. We had eaten dinner at the last airport, but if you are hungry, it is good to know that you can order food and drinks at the reception 24/7.

Are you the same as me, always a light sleeper when you know you have to wake up early and do not completely trust your mobile to wake you? The reception provide you an extra alarm clock, just in case.

Then it is time to flatten out the bed by using the electronic buttons on the side, and tuck yourself in for a good night (or some hours) sleep in the comfortable bed.

Just remember to calculate time to exit the passport control in the morning…

How to get there:
If you arrive at A, B, C or D, you have to go through the passport control to get to YOTELAIR. If you arrive late it might seem closed, but there will be a security guard there to let you through. Once you get through, go upstairs, as YOTELAIR is situated more or less just above the passport control.

Are you not flying through Schiphol? Do not despair; you find YOTELAIR at London Heathrow and Gatwick and at Charles de Gaulle in Paris as well.

Book your next comfortable airport stay at www.yotel.com.

Boracay island, The Philippines

Boracay has been voted one of the most beautiful islands in the world, and therefor attract very many tourists. Visiting in high season of course have the disadvantages of even more people.

Boracay island seen from above. Philippines.

Boracay island seen from above.

With that said, it really is a beautiful beach, long stretched, white and powdered. The beach is just perfectly shallow for children, and  the deeper water is just about close enough for adults to reach it without hassle. The thing that bothered me were the lack of authentic charm and the same shops with typical souvenirs you can find at any beach destination all over the world.

The beach at Station 3 in Boracay island. The Philippines

The beach at Station 3 in Boracay island, The Philippines

The beach at Station 3.

The beach in Boracay island. The Philippines

The beach in Station 2.

I decided to look past that fact, sit at the beach literally turning my back towards it, and focusing on the magnificent sunset. Colors painted all over the blue canvas backdrop, with some white clouds to make the extra contrasts. Sitting in the sand with drops of salty water slowly running down the chin, the wet hair hanging down at my back, border lining the feeling of cooling down and being too cold. The sight of the sunset still sends waves of happiness through my body (I am crazy about sunsets). Top it with an ice cold beer and good company, it is all you need.

Beautiful sunset at Boracay island, The Philippines. Beautiful sunset at Boracay island, The Philippines.

Staying at Villa Romero at Station 3 was a great location. Close enough to walk to most places, far enough from the party noise to get a good night sleep. To make it clear, we were not at Boracay to party all night, we were there to enjoy the beauty and some drinks along the beach. And the new year’s party with fireworks.

If you come to party, it is a great place with a large variety of venues for every desire. From quiet drinks at the beach, to bar hopping, to heavy mad dancing all night.

Street sellers are everywhere, if you sit at the beach they come to you, but they will leave you alone if you tell them no. If you actually need the things they are selling, you should go ahead and buy it. Supply and demand rocks, and you will not get it cheaper anywhere else (in my experience). If you do not have one already, dry bags will probably come in handy later on. Do not expect them to be 100 % waterproof (read: do not drag them under water), but they absolutely do the trick when you get splashed by a wave or have to wade to/from a boat. Trust me, one of the mentioned will most probably happen during your trip.

It is also a good trick for solo travelers so you can bring your valuables when you go for a dip. Trust is a good thing, but sadly not everyone can be trusted.

Relaxing mood sitting in a bean bag at the beach. Boracay Island, The Philippines

Enjoying pre-dinner drinks and sunset in a bean bag at the beach.

New Years Eve; we wanted to splurge ourselves with a nice and fancy meal. After all, it is only new years once a year, and it has to be fun, right? This is exactly what I try to run away from every year, though. We ended up with a buffet at a hotel by the beach. Not the most expensive, but by far the cheapest. Afterwards I cursed myself for not remembering that buffets are seldom particularly good. They tend to try to please everyone, ending up quite tasteless. In hindsight we could easily have eaten at a much simpler place and had a much better experience. However, if you want a beach setting, sadly they know how to charge you for it.

Nice and relaxing atmosphere at Summers Place. Boracay island, the Philippines

Nice and relaxing atmosphere at Summers Place. Before the party crowd came.

At least we left without being hungry for anything else than drinks. Ending up at a quite easy going bar, feet in the sand and happy people walking by, life was quite good. Time was running by fast, and soon it was midnight and time for fireworks. Stocked up with a large bottle of sparkling wine from the local sari-sari shop to share, we were ready to greet the New Year. Exactly a year ago, I promised myself to be at a beach for the next New Year’s, it was so much better than the cramped city life in KL last year!

The Filipinos do know how to put on a firework show. Standing in a long line, not too cramped, along the white beach, we could all watch the fireworks being send up from rafts in the sea.

Down at the beach watching the fireworks at New Year's Eve in Boracay Island, The Philippines Fireworks at New Year's Eve in Boracay Island, The Philippines

How long you want to continue the party is up to you. You certainly have the option to make it all through the morning.

A new year at Boracay Island. One of the many sand sculptures at the beach.

Anyway, there is more to Boracay than the beach on the west side. Taking a tricycle to Puka beach, showed us a completely different side of the island. The sand is not as nice, and the waves much more harsh, but the vibe is more relaxing. There are a few beach bars with sunbeds scattered around, and they could probably mix up some food if you get hungry. For the active ones, the locals play frisbee and you are more than welcome to join.

Driving through local villages on our way to Puka Beach. Boracay Island, The Philippines.

Driving through local villages on our way to Puka Beach.

Puka beach at Boracay Island, The Philippines

Banka boat at Puka beach, Boracay Island, The Philippines

Banka boat at Puka beach.

Playing frisbee at Puka beach. Boracay Island, The Philippines

Playing frisbee at Puka beach.

Puka beach, Boracay Island, The Philippines

Relaxing at Puka Beach. Boracay Island, The Philippines

We joined forces with some guys we met there, and continued exploring the island. Arriving at Ilig-Iligan beach, we did not intend to stay too long. Just go for a dip and a quick lunch. There was nothing quick about the lunch though. But, in island paradise there is no rush (except when you have a plane to catch…). When we thought we had waited far too long and started to make jokes among ourselves that they probably had to slaughter the chicken (adobo), they came over and said that they would start cooking. The food was on the table two hours after we ordered, but it was absolutely nice and tasty, and worth waiting for.

Ilig-Iligan beach at Boracay Island, The Philippines

Ilig-Iligan beach.

Time to relax at Ilig-Iligan beach at Boracay Island, The Philippines Care for a coconut? Ilig-Iligan beach at Boracay Island, The Philippines Coconut at Ilig-Iligan beach at Boracay Island, The Philippines

Despite the fact that we were running late, we still went through with our plan to go via Mt. Luhu for a great view of the island. The tricycle had a real struggle working it’s way up the steep hill, but the view was rewarding.

View of Boracay from Mount Luhu viewpoint. Boracay Island, The Philippines

View of Boracay from Mount Luhu viewpoint.

The tricycle waited for us and got us back to our hotel just in time for our pick up for the airport…

How to get to Boracay
Boracay is a relatively small island, with no airport. You can either fly into Caticlan (MPH) (sometimes mentioned as Boracay Airport) or to Kalibo (KLO). Flights to Caticlan tend to be a bit more expensive than Kalibo, but from Kalibo to Boracay it takes about 2 hours extra so you can decide yourself how much your time is worth.

Arriving at Caticlan, we were offered a door-to-door package for 600PHP per person. You can also walk right past the mini vans to get a tricycle to the boat terminal and buy the boat ticket and terminal fee there, and then get another tricycle to your accommodation on the other side. We decided time was more worth than money, and went for the easy package. In the end we were waiting quite some time to be picked up, so it probably would have been just as effective to arrange everything by ourselves.

The banka boat going to Boracay island. The Philippines.

The banka boat going to Boracay island.

From Boracay to Kalibo we did the same (paying 650PHP per person), but you can easily get a tricycle to the pier and buy the boat+van from there for 250PHP per person operated by CBTMPC Budget Tours. I have no idea about their schedule as it does not say on the web site, but if you need to know in order to plan flight etc, you can contact them. If it is not that crucial, you can ask when you arrive to the quay in Boracay, so you know the details for going back.

Where to eat
Honestly, I was not too impressed with the food I experienced in Boracay. The only place worth mentioning was Smoke. They have good local Filipino cuisine to an affordable price. They have one restaurant inside D-Mall, and one at Bulabog Beach at the other side. As their restaurant in D-Mall was full, they offered to take us for free to Bulabog Beach. We thought it would be great to see a bit more of the island anyway, so it was a win-win. As the weather turned bad and the wind was crazy, we ended up not seeing anything except the restaurant, but still it was enjoyable and we at least got to see some of the back streets along the way.

Walking around inside D Mall. Boracay Island, The Philippines

Walking around inside D Mall, Smoke restaurant on the right side.

Where to sleep
We stayed at Villa Romero in Station 3. The rooms were quite small, but clean, and as we spent minimum time there, it was ok.

Room at Villa Romero at Station 3 at Boracay island. The Philippines.

Locals and tourists enjoying the last of the day before the sun sets. Boracay Island, The Philippines.