Daytrip from Dublin to Bray and Greystone

Dublin is for many synonymous with bar, Guinness and whiskey. But both the city and the surrounding area has more to offer. We took a break from beer and did the cliff walk along the Irish Sea on the coastal path between Bray and Greystone.

The bus meanders through the streets, with traditional brick house on both sides. Every minute there is a new bus stop, and although it’s exciting to experience a bit of daily life and the great scenery, we concluded that it would probably be a better plan to take the train…

When we finally get off the bus in Bray, we strolled towards the seaside. The streets were mostly deserted, but when we got down to the beach, we understood that this is where it all happens. The restaurants are situated slightly in the rear, people and dogs wandering around, and brave child tests the water temperatures at the beach. (Un)fortunately we are not here to swim, and head towards the coastal path along the cliffs between Bray and Greystone.
Bray beach, the start of the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland

Despite my enthusiasm for views, we refrained from going up to the huge cross that looms on the mound at the start of the walk. The view of the beach and ocean is great from the trail as well. Besides, we were looking for something completely different; Europe’s first geocache. It was also my very first. Geocaching is an outdoor treasure hunt using GPS. Participants navigate to a specific set of GPS coordinates and then attempt to find the geocache (container) hidden at that location.

Found Europes first cache along the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland

We found Europe’s first cache!

The excitement escalated when the GPS was signalizing we were approaching the goal. The number of meters to the target sank asynchronously with our crawl up the hill. We moved rocks, looked around a little more, and finally realized where it was. Under a small pile of rocks, we found the camouflaged box. The feeling of triumph by finding the “treasure” rushed through me, but what I liked the most about the idea is that you can learn so much about the history and the place you visit if those who place the cache has submitted this information. This is naturally highly variable from person to person. We logged in the book and at the app, and buried the cache again.

Back to the more obvious treasure; the nature surrounding us. Spring was coming on strong, the bushes and the grass was bright green and the yellow and pink flowers competed to be the brightest colored. Who wins is hard to determine. From time to time we heard the train that passed below us. Otherwise it was mostly quiet, except for the small talk between people who passed us. Even the wind held its breath.
Flowers and an old stone house along the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland The cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland Bright colors along the path of the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, IrelandEnjoying the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland Nice view of the beach in Greystone from the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland

The trail has a comfortable steady ascent until the equally pleasant downhill at the point the long sandy beach at Greystone appears. The last stretch was frankly a bit boring and we dream of a glass of ice-cold white wine. The search for a suitable place in the sun started. We hit jackpot with “Summerville’s of Greystone”, a cozy cafe in a yellow house along the road, with white and flowered wallpaper and old-fashioned wooden table and chairs. A very cozy place, with lunch, cake and ice cream on the menu. There is also a colorful backyard with wrought iron tables and flowers hanging along the wall. But everything else than sitting out in the sun was out of the question, so we sat in the front and fried.
Summerville in Greystone. Perfect for lunch and white wine after the cliff walk between Bray and Greystone outside Dublin, Ireland

The small coastal village, however, has more to offer. Just a stone’s throw away, on the little bridge over the railway line, big wine barrels function as tables outside of small wine bar. Heat rises in the sun, and cooled wine is certainly appropriate.

The heat was rising in front of the ticket machine at the station as well, as the seconds were ticking and the train approaching. There is a saying there is always a train. But not necessarily when you need it. The moral is to be early for ticket purchase. When the hunger also arise again, it is best to be on the safe side.

Since we were on a day trip, we thought we could exploit it to the fullest. The best seafood is found along the coast, so we went to the small coastal town of Howth for dinner. The train went directly from Greystone to Howth via Dublin. The village itself seemed relatively calm and quiet, but I envision the bustling life outside the bars and restaurants along the harbor when the heat sets in. Now however, it was only us as stubborn Norwegians, and a few locals, who insisted on having a cold beer outside, while the rays of the sun decreased in strength.

Our wine day continued during the seafood dinner at King Sitric. We ordered a little of everything and shared it all. Absolutely perfect!
King Sitric restaurant in Howth outside Dublin, Ireland

A little taste of the seafood in Howth outside Dublin, Ireland

A little taste of the seafood in Howth.

The gorgeous day was about to end as we strolled relaxed along the water back toward the train station. The sun was setting in the sea and colored the sky pink behind the many boats in the harbor. For many of them this was soon beginning of a new day of fishing, while for us was yet another great memory of a beautiful day.
Sun is setting in Howth outside Dublin, Ireland Sunset in Howth outside Dublin, Ireland Sunset in the harbor in Howth outside Dublin, Ireland

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